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Join us in making the arts in Vermont more inclusive and accessible for all and have your gift matched!

Inclusive Arts Vermont uses the magic of the arts to engage the capabilities and enhance the confidence of children and adults with disabilities. Your generous support ensures we can continue that magic! While one-time gifts are always welcome and greatly appreciated, consistent, reliable support from our committed network of sustaining donors ensures that Inclusive Arts Vermont can continue that magic without interruption year after year. This spring, we are inviting you to become a part of this sustaining community.

For our 2024 spring appeal campaign, we’ve set a goal of 40 new sustaining donors at $50 per month. Our leadership is so committed to this goal that for every new sustaining donor commitment between now and the end of June, our Board of Directors has agreed to match your first monthly donation (up to a grand total of $2,200)!

By becoming part of our sustaining donor community, you are increasing access to the arts for Vermonters with disabilities on an ongoing basis. Your involvement goes beyond just a financial contribution; you are a vital part of our extended family. Recurring donations not only provide financial assistance but also send a powerful message that you are deeply invested in the systemic change we are striving to achieve.

We also understand that, for some, a monthly commitment may not be possible and welcome and appreciate your one-time gifts.


Learn more about the core programs your gifts support:

A yoga studio. Hanging from the ceiling are large hammock structures. There are outlines of bodies resting in the hammocks.
Image description: A yoga studio. Hanging from the ceiling are large hammock structures. There are outlines of bodies resting in the hammocks.

Adult Arts Education

Engages participants with disabilities as they discover talents, learn new skills, and express creativity, all in a supportive, inclusive environment.

“Went to class just to say hi to peers and listen. When someone gave me a drum, I pounded the negative emotions.”

-Class Participant

Two children are outdoors painting with their fingers and toes. One is standing on a large canvas with feet covered in red and blue paint and the other is seated on the ground with legs crossed and hands covered in paint, with one hand placed on the canvas. The canvas itself is coated in many streaks, swirls and waves of blue and red paint, which in some spots has blended to create a purple hue. For privacy purposes, the children’s faces are not visible, but their joy for the artmaking process shines through their engagement in the creative process.
Image description: Two children in IAV’s K-12 residency program are outdoors painting with their fingers and toes on a large canvas. Red handprints and hearts are visible on the canvas, along with a sea of blue.

Collaborative Arts Integration Residencies (CAIR)

Teaching artists work directly with teachers in K-12 school settings to integrate the arts into the curriculum to support social and emotional development for reluctant and reactive learners.

“I am useful. See – and I’m not done yet!”

-School Residency Student

CYCLES Artist Gyllian Rae Svensson poses in front of her artwork at the exhibition opening reception in February 2024.
Image description: CYCLES Artist Gyllian Rae Svensson poses in front of her artwork at the exhibition opening reception in February 2024.

Exhibitions

Showcases work by Vermont artists with disabilities.

“I was validated, and with quiet breath, am able to finally at least whisper to myself, that perhaps I am an ‘artist’.”

-Exhibiting Artist

A laptop screen reads "Disability is not a bad word" in black text on a yellow background. Two event speakers are visible in Zoom squares on the right-hand side.
Image description: A laptop screen reads “Disability is not a bad word” in black text on a yellow background. Two event speakers are visible in Zoom squares on the right-hand side.

Professional Development

Custom consulting and training for organizations and individuals on inclusive practices.

“Overall, I gained a greater awareness of the range of disabilities across race/gender/ different populations.”

-Arts Access Summit Participant

Photo from a recent provider-led session of Start With the Arts. Shown are childrens’ hands painting with watercolors and a multicolored painting in process.
Image description: Photo from a recent provider-led session of Start With the Arts. Shown are childrens’ hands painting with watercolors and a multicolored painting in process.

Start With the Arts

An award-winning arts-based literacy program for early childhood educators and the children in their care.

“I felt that I had enough to do and that the children would not cooperate with someone coming into my program. I was wrong. Once I gave it a chance, I saw these children grow!”

-Participating Early Childhood Educator


Join us in making these programs consistently possible:

We’re so grateful for our donors! You matter, your contribution matters, this work matters.